News

Information Categories

RELATED NEWS
相关新闻

How Do

发表日期:2017-07-17  

If you follow job ads in China closely, you will soon find there is no lack of work in sight for "native teachers/writers/consultants", provided they come from the US, Canada, Australia or another "English-speaking" countries. But what about the "non-native" foreigners in China? How do they find a job here?


1

Play the Part


Pretend to be a native speaker. You may be required to say that you come from one of the "highly-rated" English speaking countries. If you have the necessary language skills and no distinctive accent, playing the part can open up a lot of opportunities in the education industry (from kindergartens to corporate training) and can be, at least a foot in the door of the Chinese employment market.


Note: You should be aware that this route is by no means legal, and as such there will be no protections for you, should your relationship with your employer head south.


2

To sell or not to sell


Occasionally, you'll come across a job offer asking for a person of a specific nationality. These are mainly ads for sales representatives, who will be tasked with finding customers in their home countries.

Unfortunately, the positions in the sales industry are commission-based, with the standard salary often being quite low. But if your goal is to make a career in the import/export business or learn the ropes for starting your own company, this may be the way in.


3

Do you have a skill?


As strange as it sounds, you may be ignoring a long-forgotten skill that can turn out to be very helpful. It could be a sport, something you learned in art class, above-average IT abilities or design. This may be the perfect place to turn your beloved hobby into a money-making enterprise.


For example, a normal Russian university student with a passion for video games who went on to create an in-house gaming center in China, teaching other enthusiasts the tricks of the trade. 


4

Hunt jobs at home


Scan the job ads back home for companies looking to expand into Chinese markets or already working here. They may well be in need of professionals already based in China, who could save them the cost of bringing people over. And if you have lived in China for a while, your experience and/or language skills could also be considered as a valuable asset.

Job websites for foreigners:

  • eChinacities.com

  • gzstuff.com (Guangzhou)

  • AsiaExpat (Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou)

  • bjstuff.com (Beijing)

  • JobLeadChina

  • wedojob.com


5

Taobao


Most foreigners are well acquainted with Taobao as customers, but an increasing number are beginning to use it as a business platform as well.


While it's fairly easy to set up a Taobao shop, it's important to keep in mind that you will likely need local help to deal with the import regulations as well as a trusted assistant to help with customer service and other minor issues.


Do you have other ideas of hunting jobs in China? Tell us your ideas!

Room 2501, 25/F, South Tower, World Trade Center, No.371-375 Huanshidong Rd, Yuexiu District, Guangzhou, China(Line 5, Taojin Metro Station, Exit B)

Tel:86-20-28071838

Mail: service@dada-hongkong.com

Q Q:2414962673

(WeChat):HK_DADA

微信